Department of Medicine NEWS

LATEST NEWS

American College of Physicians Recognizes Dr. Andrew Olson

Dr. Olson, from the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, has been awarded The Herbert S. Waxman Award for Outstanding Medical Student Educator for his dedication to the advancement of education.

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RECENT RESEARCH FINDINGS AND CLINICAL TRIALS

Taking Clinical Findings from the Research Bench to the Bedside

Benson - News

Dr. Brad Benson, professor in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School and Chief Academic Officer for M Health Fairview, shares three key themes after a year of research during the COVID-19 pandemic that have shaped the future of science between the Medical School and within the M Health Fairview system. 

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CLINICAL TRIAL: METFORMIN TREATMENT FOR COVID-19

The multi-site clinical trial is currently seeking volunteers for the outpatient study

The clinical trial is studying the effectiveness of metformin, a generic medication for type 2 diabetes, in the treatment of COVID-19. It will be the first randomized clinical trial for COVID-19 in the world to include pregnant women.

“Observational studies like this cannot be conclusive but do contribute to growing bodies of evidence,” said Carolyn Bramante, MD, principal investigator of the study and an assistant professor of general internal medicine at the U of M Medical School. “To complete this study, we are currently enrolling volunteers through six institutions in the U.S., including in Minneapolis.” READ STORY - 03/15/2021

M PHYSICIANS NEPHROLOGIST, PAUL DRAWZ, SHINES A SPOTLIGHT ON CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

Paul Drawz

Paul Drawz, MD, a 2003 alumnus of the University of Minnesota Medical School and an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at the University of Minnesota Medical School, originally became interested in the kidneys because they are impacted by so many disparate conditions. READ STORY

New Developmental Therapeutics Clinic Opens

The new Developmental Therapeutics Clinic (DTC) is officially open after years of planning. Associate professor of medicine Dr. Manish Patel and professor of medicine Dr. Charles Ryan designed the clinic as a more streamlined way to house phase one clinical cancer trials. Anywhere from six to ten trials can occur simultaneously at the clinic. During this stage in cancer trials, treatments are tested for safety, dosage and efficacy in different forms of cancer.

After approval, treatments will continue to be developed elsewhere and will be tailored to target individual cancer types, Dr. Naomi Fujioka said. In recent years, drugs have also been developed to target specific genetic traits and other characteristics of cancer. READ THE MINNESOTA DAILY ARTICLE

Pandemic Could Cause People to Delay Cancer Screenings & Treatment

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to have a grip on the nation, health experts are now worried it could cause patients to delay cancer screenings or treatments. Research suggests even a two-month delay in cancer screenings or treatments could lead to a more progressive diagnosis and increased deaths. The shutdown of cancer screenings at local health facilities during the start of the pandemic and people’s fears of visiting hospitals could be contributing factors. Health professionals say the purpose of screenings are to help save lives. 

“The goal for all of us, who work in cancer, is to make it so no ones quality or quantity of life is effected by this disease. We know in certain cancers like Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colon Cancer, and Lung Cancer screenings is an important way to meet those goals,” said Dr. Douglas Yee, a medical oncologist with the U of M Medical School.

Screenings also help to detect diseases like Breast Cancer early, which can have a survival rate of about 95-percent.

U of MN Scientists Learn Major Discoveries about COVID-19 Treatment

A new study shows the virus likes to infect the cells in our airways, and remdesivir effectively reduced viral replication in those cells. "Not all drugs translate well into the pill form," says Dr. Susan Kline, an infectious disease physician with the University of Minnesota Medical School and M Health Fairview. "So there are a number of different hurdles that have to be overcome." READ KARE11 STORY