4 Faculty Ranked in the 2019 NIH PM&R Principal Investigators

From left to right: Drs. Dawn Lowe, Ricardo Battaglino, and Bernadette Gillick. Missing Dr. Arin Ellingson.

The Department is proud to announce that four of our faculty, Drs. Ricardo Battaglino, Arin Ellingson, Bernadette Gillick, and Dawn Lowe, are in the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research 2019 NIH PM&R Principal Investigator rankings. Congratulations and thank you for the innovative work that you bring to the Department. 

    • Dr. Dawn Lowe, #10
    • Dr. Ricardo Battaglino, #30
    • Bernadette Gillick, #53
    • Dr. Arin Ellingson, #65

Ricardo Battaglino, PhD, is a Professor and the Vice Chair of Research, in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. Dr. Battaglino runs the Rehabilitation Medicine Translational Research Lab along with Department Chair, Dr. Leslie Morse. He is a molecular biologist with an interest in basic biology of bone metabolism.

Dawn Lowe, PhD, is a Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies in the Division of Rehabilitation Science. Dr. Lowe's research interests include muscle physiology, aging, muscular dystrophy, and exercise science. The focus of her research is cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle deterioration that occur with age, injury, and disease. Her current studies are also aimed at preventing or reversing this muscle deterioration through exercise and pharmacological interventions.
 
Arin Ellingson, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy and one of the lab directors for the Minnesota Rehabilitation Biomechanics Lab. His research interests include functional biomechanics of the spine (lumbar and cervical), instability, intervertebral degeneration, and scoliosis. 
 
Bernadette Gillick, PhD, MSPT, PT, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy, McKnight Land Grant Professor, and the lab director for the Gillick Pediatric Neuromodulation Laboratory. Dr. Gillick's research interest is in cortical plasticity and recovery from neurologic insult across the lifespan. Her research encompasses the use of different forms of non-invasive brain stimulation (transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial Direct Current stimulation), in combination with behavioral training, for improved motor function after brain injury.

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