Tick collector: Duluth Campus Lyme Disease Researcher Seeks Public’s Input

Ben Clarke holds two vials, one containing an adult tick (left) and the other a nymph. Each vial in the box at right contains a tick. All are kept in deep freeze at 112 degrees below Fahrenheit. Bob King / rking@duluthnews.com.

University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus, Biomedical Sciences Professor, Dr. Benjamin Clarke talks with the Duluth News Tribune about combating Lyme disease through the Tick Project. 

"I really prefer the deer tick," said Clarke, in his office on the third floor of the University of Minnesota Medical School's Duluth campus. "I'm after Lyme disease. It's very particular about what tick it's in.

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How to Participate:

If you're interested in obtaining a tick kit or inviting Benjamin Clarke to speak to your group, you can contact him at bclarke@d.umn.edu or by calling (218) 726-6587.

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