UMN Study Backs Up Connection Between Atrial Fibrillation and Dementia

After conducting one of the longest and most comprehensive studies to date, Dr. Lin Yee Chen, Department of Medicine, found additional evidence that those diagnosed with atrial fibrillation may be at greater risk for cognitive decline and dementia. However, additional research is needed to prove that it is more than correlation.

Dr. Chen stated for the American Heart Association that another hypothesis that needs to be investigated is whether “some other factor that is closely related to AFib, such as [an abnormal upper left heart chamber], may be the underlying mechanism for cognitive decline or dementia.”

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