2022 ibp grad group
 

All IBP Graduate Students

Rawan Almutlaq
Graduate Student

almut051@umn.edu

Evans Lab

Babatunde Anidu
Graduate Student

anidu001@umn.edu

Fanta Barrow
PhD Candidate

fbarrow@umn.edu

Revelo lab

Characterizing the role of immune cells in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Daniel Baumann
Ph.D. Candidate

dbaumann@umn.edu

Osborn Lab

Understanding cytokine mediated renal afferent nerve activity in hypertension.

Houda Cohen, MD
Ph.D. Candidate

cohen461@umn.edu

Metzgzer lab

Arthur de la Cruz-Lynch, Graduate Student (MD/Ph.D)
Ph.D. Candidate (MSTP)

delac086@umn.edu

Osborn Lab

Developing experimental surgical interventions and devices to treat hypertension and other cardiometabolic diseases in a DOCA salt sheep model of hypertension.

I decided to pursue a PhD because I enjoyed the ever evolving challenge of research and exploration. I had a wonderful experience in my undergraduate immunology laboratory, but I was always fascinated with the beautiful anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system. Going into the application cycle, I knew that I wanted to pursue a program that had a wide breadth of cardiovascular research opportunities and a supportive and inclusive academic environment. Only after I visited Minnesota did I fall in love with the amazing parks, bike trails, restaurants, climbing gyms, beautiful lakes, and most importantly, the wonderfully kind people in the community! I'm happy to be a part of John Osborn's laboratory, where we test surgical devices and procedures centered around neuromodulation to combat high blood pressure in the DOCA-salt sheep model of hypertension.

Katherine Fallon
Graduate Student (MSTP)

fallo068@umn.edu

Lowe and Ervasti labs

Full bio

Nicholas Gomez
Graduate Student

gomez631@umn.edu

Tracy Her, Graduate Student
Graduate Student

herxx397@umn.edu

Seokwon Jo
Ph.D. Candidate

joxxx057@umn.edu

Alejandro lab

Investigating the interplay between O-GlcNAc and mTORC1 signaling in modulating autophagy-driven pancreatic beta cell function

After graduating with B.S. in Biochemistry from University of Minnesota, I wanted to explore and further hone my skills in biomedical research, where I had found a home in Dr. Alejandro's lab in IBP department. Here, I became fascinated by the complexity of physiology at systemic level and was enamored by the lab's expertise and ability to study the molecular metabolism and signaling in pancreatic beta cells and their subsequent effects in whole-body glucose metabolism. This experience inspired me to further pursue PhD degree in physiology and investigate important biological signalings that affect the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

Jenna Mendelson
Graduate Student

mende192@umn.edu

Prins Lab

Jennifer Mikkila
PhD Candidate

winte608@umn.edu

van Berlo lab

Eunice Oribamise
Graduate Student

oriba004@umn.edu

Jean Pierre Pallais
Ph.D. Candidate

palla058@umn.edu

Bartolomucci Lab

Defining the sites of action and function of TLQP-21 on its receptor, C3aR1, within the central nervous system and its contribution to metabolic regulation.

I graduated with a B.S in Neuroscience from the University of Minnesota. I was expecting to study strictly neuroscience at the time, being somewhat naïve to what neuroscience is truly all about. That was until I started working in Dr. Catherine Kotz’s lab, in which I was studying neuroscience but in the context of physiology. This exposure gave birth to a passion that I didn’t know that I had, that being the role of the brain in regulating our metabolic physiology. Moreso specifically, looking at how aging and neurodegenerative diseases take a huge toll on our physiology as a whole. Perhaps I started off with a very narrow vision on what I wanted to study, but my time working in an IBP lab really inspired me to continue with my studies by pursuing a PhD in Physiology.


Full bio

Preethy Parthiban
Ph.D. Candidate

parth034@umn.edu

Revelo Lab

Investigating the role of resident cardiac macrophages in steady state and pathophysiology


Sara Puccini
Graduate Student

pucci026@umn.edu

O'Connell Lab

Ingrid Rodriguez Aragon
Graduate Student

rodri754@umn.edu

Batchelor Lab

Pedro Rodriguez
Ph.D. Candidate

rodr0385@umn.edu

Bartolomucci Lab

Characterizing the biochemical mechanism of TLQP-21 activation of C3aR1 and its role in energy balance.

Jae Hwi Sung
Ph.D. Candidate

sung0031@umn.edu

Liu Lab

Characterizing roles of MICU 1, a component of the MCU complex in the heart.

I received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Biomedical Science at Korea University. When I was in Korea, I was experienced in the field of molecular diagnostics, cardiac electrophysiology, and clinical chemistry. At that moment, I have seen that Ca2 handling in the cardiomyocyte is closely related to metabolism. Thus, I was always curious about mitochondria’s role in the heart. Finally, I am exploring mitochondrial roles in cardiac physiology in Julia Liu lab within the IBP department.

Full bio

Dogacan Yücel
Ph.D. Candidate

dyucel@umn.edu

van Berlo Lab

Identification of genes mediating cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest.

Naixin Zhang
Ph.D. Candidate

zhan5038@umn.edu

O'Connell Lab

Identification of the role of omego-3 fatty acid's receptor FFAR4 in terms of cardiac dysfunction and metabolic dysfunction in HFD-induced obese mice.

Year 1

Babatunde Anidu
Graduate Student

anidu001@umn.edu

Katherine Fallon
Graduate Student (MSTP)

fallo068@umn.edu

Lowe and Ervasti labs

Full bio

Nicholas Gomez
Graduate Student

gomez631@umn.edu

Tracy Her, Graduate Student
Graduate Student

herxx397@umn.edu

Eunice Oribamise
Graduate Student

oriba004@umn.edu

Year 2

Rawan Almutlaq
Graduate Student

almut051@umn.edu

Evans Lab

Jenna Mendelson
Graduate Student

mende192@umn.edu

Prins Lab

Sara Puccini
Graduate Student

pucci026@umn.edu

O'Connell Lab

Year 3

Arthur de la Cruz-Lynch, Graduate Student (MD/Ph.D)
Ph.D. Candidate (MSTP)

delac086@umn.edu

Osborn Lab

Developing experimental surgical interventions and devices to treat hypertension and other cardiometabolic diseases in a DOCA salt sheep model of hypertension.

I decided to pursue a PhD because I enjoyed the ever evolving challenge of research and exploration. I had a wonderful experience in my undergraduate immunology laboratory, but I was always fascinated with the beautiful anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system. Going into the application cycle, I knew that I wanted to pursue a program that had a wide breadth of cardiovascular research opportunities and a supportive and inclusive academic environment. Only after I visited Minnesota did I fall in love with the amazing parks, bike trails, restaurants, climbing gyms, beautiful lakes, and most importantly, the wonderfully kind people in the community! I'm happy to be a part of John Osborn's laboratory, where we test surgical devices and procedures centered around neuromodulation to combat high blood pressure in the DOCA-salt sheep model of hypertension.

Jennifer Mikkila
PhD Candidate

winte608@umn.edu

van Berlo lab

Ingrid Rodriguez Aragon
Graduate Student

rodri754@umn.edu

Batchelor Lab

Year 4

Fanta Barrow
PhD Candidate

fbarrow@umn.edu

Revelo lab

Characterizing the role of immune cells in the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Houda Cohen, MD
Ph.D. Candidate

cohen461@umn.edu

Metzgzer lab

Preethy Parthiban
Ph.D. Candidate

parth034@umn.edu

Revelo Lab

Investigating the role of resident cardiac macrophages in steady state and pathophysiology


Jean Pierre Pallais
Ph.D. Candidate

palla058@umn.edu

Bartolomucci Lab

Defining the sites of action and function of TLQP-21 on its receptor, C3aR1, within the central nervous system and its contribution to metabolic regulation.

I graduated with a B.S in Neuroscience from the University of Minnesota. I was expecting to study strictly neuroscience at the time, being somewhat naïve to what neuroscience is truly all about. That was until I started working in Dr. Catherine Kotz’s lab, in which I was studying neuroscience but in the context of physiology. This exposure gave birth to a passion that I didn’t know that I had, that being the role of the brain in regulating our metabolic physiology. Moreso specifically, looking at how aging and neurodegenerative diseases take a huge toll on our physiology as a whole. Perhaps I started off with a very narrow vision on what I wanted to study, but my time working in an IBP lab really inspired me to continue with my studies by pursuing a PhD in Physiology.


Full bio

Seokwon Jo
Ph.D. Candidate

joxxx057@umn.edu

Alejandro lab

Investigating the interplay between O-GlcNAc and mTORC1 signaling in modulating autophagy-driven pancreatic beta cell function

After graduating with B.S. in Biochemistry from University of Minnesota, I wanted to explore and further hone my skills in biomedical research, where I had found a home in Dr. Alejandro's lab in IBP department. Here, I became fascinated by the complexity of physiology at systemic level and was enamored by the lab's expertise and ability to study the molecular metabolism and signaling in pancreatic beta cells and their subsequent effects in whole-body glucose metabolism. This experience inspired me to further pursue PhD degree in physiology and investigate important biological signalings that affect the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

Year 5 and beyond

Daniel Baumann
Ph.D. Candidate

dbaumann@umn.edu

Osborn Lab

Understanding cytokine mediated renal afferent nerve activity in hypertension.

Pedro Rodriguez
Ph.D. Candidate

rodr0385@umn.edu

Bartolomucci Lab

Characterizing the biochemical mechanism of TLQP-21 activation of C3aR1 and its role in energy balance.

Jae Hwi Sung
Ph.D. Candidate

sung0031@umn.edu

Liu Lab

Characterizing roles of MICU 1, a component of the MCU complex in the heart.

I received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Biomedical Science at Korea University. When I was in Korea, I was experienced in the field of molecular diagnostics, cardiac electrophysiology, and clinical chemistry. At that moment, I have seen that Ca2 handling in the cardiomyocyte is closely related to metabolism. Thus, I was always curious about mitochondria’s role in the heart. Finally, I am exploring mitochondrial roles in cardiac physiology in Julia Liu lab within the IBP department.

Full bio

Dogacan Yücel
Ph.D. Candidate

dyucel@umn.edu

van Berlo Lab

Identification of genes mediating cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest.

Naixin Zhang
Ph.D. Candidate

zhan5038@umn.edu

O'Connell Lab

Identification of the role of omego-3 fatty acid's receptor FFAR4 in terms of cardiac dysfunction and metabolic dysfunction in HFD-induced obese mice.

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