Developmental Educational Scholarship Portfolio

The Office of Faculty Affairs created the Developmental Educational Scholarship Portfolio to help faculty plan and reflect on their work related to medical education and educational research. It is based on the Medical School’s Education Scholarship Task Force Report, chaired in 2016 by University of Minnesota Professor of Medicine L. James Nixon MD, MHPE, and a growing body of work nationwide that emphasizes the importance of medical education and educational research. The Medical School created this portfolio to encourage faculty to plan and present educational scholarship as part of their achievements.

 This portfolio is designed to help you:

  • Plan and reflect upon your career as an educator

  • Capture educational activities in one place

Use the portfolio to document activities that specifically relate to your educational scholarship, delete sections that do not apply and add sections that are relevant to you. Revisit the portfolio as you add accomplishments or at a minimum, once per year. Convey not only quantity, but quality, impact and scholarly approach. 

STATEMENT OF EDUCATION PHILOSOPHY

Writing an educational philosophy

An educational philosophy describes your approach to education and the principles that underlie your teaching, mentorship, advising and assessment of learners. For example, think about what makes your educational contributions unique, what characteristics of an outstanding educator are most important to you, and in your experience, what helps and what hinders learners. Reflect on your strengths and weaknesses as an educator. Include how you continue to develop yourself as an educator and how you incorporate your own professional development and reflection as an educator into your teaching.

  • Boyer’s definition of scholarship (*):
  • Glassick’s criteria for assessment of scholarship (**, ***):
  • SMART Goals (****)
  • Boyer’s definition of scholarship (*):

    • The scholarship of discovery: Answering what we know and what’s next to learn

    • The scholarship of integration: Making connection across disciplines and placing specialties in larger context; answering why “discovery” is important

    • The scholarship of application: Demonstrating the vital interaction between research and practice, where one continuously informs the other

    • The scholarship of teaching: Emphasizing the creation of new knowledge about teaching and learning; seeks to expand and transform knowledge

  • Glassick’s criteria for assessment of scholarship (**, ***):

    • Clear goals: Explicitly states the basic purposes for the work and defines realistic achievable objections, including goals and outcomes

    • Adequate preparation: Shows an understanding of existing scholarship to the endeavor and has skills and resources to advance the project

    • Appropriate methods: Chooses, applies and when necessary, modifies methods wisely

    • Significant results: Achieves the goals and contributes notably to the field in a manner that invites further exploration

    • Effective presentation: Uses a suitable style and organization to present the work with clarity and integrity to reach an intended audience

    • Reflective critique: Assesses the work and uses resulting perception, along with reviews and critique, to refine, enhance or expand the original concept

  • SMART Goals (****)

    - Specific
    - Measurable
    - Achievable
    - Relevant
    - Time-oriented 

    • (*) Boyer EL. Scholarship revisited: Priorities for the Professoriate 1990; The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Princeton, NJ. (attach link to full article)
    • (**) Glassick, C. E., Huber, M. T., & Maeroff, G. I. (1997). Scholarship assessed: Evaluation of the professoriate: an Ernest L. Boyer project of the Carnegie Foundation for the advancement of teaching. San Francisco: Jossey‐Bass.
    • (***) Glassick, C.E. Boyer’s Expanded Definitions of Scholarship, the Standards for Assessing Scholarship, and the Elusiveness of the Scholarship of Teaching,Academic Medicine (2000) 75:877-880
    • (****) Doran G, Miller A, Cunningham J. There's a S.M.A.R.T. way to write management goals and objectives. Management Review, Vol. 70, Issue 11, pp. 35-36,Nov 1981

The template for this section is located within the primary portfolio Google doc.

TEACHING ACTIVITY, ASSESSMENT, AND AWARDS

The following should be completed within this portion of the portfolio:

  • Teaching Table:
  • Teaching Assessment:
  • Teaching Awards:
  • Teaching Table:

      • Undergraduate/graduate/post-doctoral/other teaching activities and courses taught, including course number, title, brief description, quarter/semester, role, and number of students enrolled should be all the data collected within the Teaching Table (*) that encourages active learning (e.g. teaching method used such as interactive lectures, small group sessions, workshops, and clinical precepting in addition to didactic lectures). ACCURATE NUMBERS FOR LEARNERS AND HOURS ARE IMPORTANT.

      • In a separate statement, pick one or two specific teaching activities and describe the importance, creativity, innovation, and impact of the teaching activities included within the Teaching Table.

  • Teaching Assessment:

      • Complete the Teaching Evaluation Summary table (*) to include list of formal teaching evaluations (student or peer) over time. Summarize the evaluations obtained through the Office of Measurement Services forms or other formal measurement tools for evaluation of teaching effectiveness.

        • NOTE: Do not include any raw evaluation data.

        • Informal teaching evaluations such as peer, student, and advisee letters.  If including actual letters, indicate whether letters were solicited or unsolicited or are an established component of the department's process of evaluating teaching effectiveness.

  • Teaching Awards:

    Complete the Teaching Awards Grid (*) to include a listing of honors/awards received for teaching effectiveness. Include dates and sponsoring institution/organization. Indicate if the award is departmental, institutional, regional, national or international, and describe briefly, including the criteria on which the award is based.

OVERVIEW OF SECTION 2:

  1. How did the information obtained through your teaching activities and their evaluation change your educational practice?

  2. Describe evidence that your teaching activities have been developed using a scholarly approach (for ideas, review Glassick’s article, Acad. Med. 2000; 877-880).

  3. Describe any products of educational scholarship that were peer reviewed, presented, or published, or adopted for use in other programs as a result of your teaching activities.

  4. Share any reflections on teaching activities that are not covered above.

 (*) All table(s) are located within the primary portfolio Google doc.

MENTORING AND ADVISING

Within the Mentoring Training Table (*), list the persons trained/mentored/advised in research, degree sought, role as advisor, and status of advisee at time of training. Include current position of these individuals, if known. Describe your mentoring philosophy and the process by which you typically mentor early career professionals. 

NOTE: Data entered into the Mentoring Training Table (*) must be extensive/defined relationships with mentees. One meeting with an individual does not qualify as extensive experience.

OVERVIEW OF SECTION 3:

  1. How did the information obtained through your mentoring and advising activities and their evaluation change your educational/mentoring practice?

  2. Describe evidence that your mentoring and advising activities have been developed using a scholarly approach (for ideas, review Glassick’s article, Acad. Med. 2000; 75: 877-880).

  3. Describe any products of educational scholarship that were peer reviewed, presented or published, or adopted for use in other programs as a result of your mentoring and advising activities.

  4. Share any reflections on mentoring and advising activities that are not covered above.

(*) All table(s) are located within the primary portfolio Google doc.

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, ENDURING EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS, ALTMETRICS AND DIGITAL MEDIA

List any and all curriculum development involving courses, seminars, laboratories, curriculum guides, assessment activities for student learning, service learning materials, rubrics, etc. within the Curriculum Information Grid (*). For materials that are different from traditionally published work, such as printed or recorded materials, or computer-presented activity that may be used over time, this data is to be placed within the Enduring Educational Materials, Altmetrics, and Digital Media table (*).

Altmetrics and Digital Media

In scholarly and scientific publishing, altmetrics are non-traditional metrics meant to complement more traditional citation metrics, tracking the attention and visibility of the posts. Social media metrics may include: blog posts, tweets, likes, and shares (via Blog, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, or other social media sites) that reference the scholarship research.

GNOME Framework for Quality of Curricular Design (**)

Choose one curriculum within the Curriculum Information Grid (*) as an example of your best effort, and describe this one using the GNOME framework within the GNOME Information Grid. Add additional narrative details or comments if you wish.

  • Goals and Objectives: The goals are appropriate in scope, objectives are specific and measurable.

  • Needs assessment of learners: Curricular design uses learner needs assessment to choose and refine goals and objectives and instructional methods, uses learner assessment data to refine needs assessment.

  • Teaching/Learning Methods: Curricular design includes a variety of methods that address educational goals, are aligned with objectives and meets the needs of diverse learners in specific educational settings.

  • Learner Assessment and Feedback: Curricular design includes valid reliable feasible and appropriate learner assessment methods. Incorporates formative feedback in design.

  • Curriculum/Program Evaluation: Curriculum is evaluated periodically using valid reliable, feasible and appropriate evaluation tools and modified based on the results of such evaluation. 

**GNOME: G = Goals, N = Needs, O = Objectives, M = Methods, E = Evaluation. [Roberts, K B. Educational principles of community-based education. Pediatrics. 1996; 98(6 Pt 2):1259-1263.]

OVERVIEW OF SECTION 4:

  1. How did the information obtained through your curricular development activities change your educational practice?

  2. Describe evidence that your curricular development activities have been developed using scholarly approach (for ideas, review Glassick’s article, Acad. Med. 2000; 75: 877-880).

  3. Describe any products of educational scholarship that were peer reviewed, presented or published, or adopted for use in other programs as a result of your curricular development activities.

  4. Share any reflections on your curricular development activities that are not covered above.

(*) All table(s) are located within the primary portfolio Google doc.

LEARNER ASSESSMENT

In the Learner Assessment Grid (*), describe the learner assessment methods you employ (use Activity Numbers from the Teaching Table, if appropriate.)  You may evaluate learners in a setting where you do not teach (e.g. OSCEs). Each assessment method should be listed only once, not repetitively for each course or conference.

OVERVIEW OF SECTION 5:

  1. How did the information obtained through your learner assessment activities change your educational practice?

  2. Describe evidence that your assessment tools were developed using a scholarly approach (for ideas, review Glassick’s article, Acad. Med. 2000; 75: 807-880).

  3. Describe any products of educational scholarship that were peer reviewed, presented or published, or adopted for use in other programs as a result of your learner assessment activities.

  4. Share any reflections on teaching activities that are not covered above.

(*) All table(s) are located within the primary portfolio Google doc.

LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION

Provide a list of past or present leadership roles in education. Include fellowship/residency/clerkship director or associate director, site director, continuity clinic director, leader of an education subcommittee/curriculum committee, project director on a training grant, and director of a faculty development program. Document your depth of involvement within the Leadership/Administrative Grid (*).

  1. Choose ONE program as an example of your best efforts and provide the following:

    • Narrative description of the program and its impact;

    • Evidence of scholarly approach to this role/task.

  2. Results of evaluation of your ROLE by outside agencies (e.g. ACGME, LCME, NBME, funding agencies).

  3. Using the Professional National Reviewer/Moderator Activities Grid (*), record any reviewer/moderator activities whether that be grants, papers, abstracts, etc. and note the duration of the activity in years and what organization/institution/agency sponsored that activity.

OVERVIEW OF SECTION 6:

  1. How did the information obtained through your leadership and administration activities and their evaluation change your educational practice?

  2. Describe evidence that your leadership and administration activities have been developed using a scholarly approach (for ideas, review Glassick’s article, Acad. Med. 2000; 75: 877-880).

  3. Describe any products of educational scholarship that were peer reviewed, presented or published, or adopted for use in other programs as a result of your leadership and administration activities.

  4. Share any reflections on leadership and administration activities that are not covered above.

(*) All table(s) are located within the primary portfolio Google doc.

SCHOLARLY APPROACH TO EDUCATION

**NOTE: Sections 7 & 8 on scholarly approach to education and products of educational scholarship are vitally important to promotion as an educator. Although you have included relevant information about your scholarly work under each domain, these two sections allow you to highlight your scholarly approach and compile all products of educational scholarship, so they are easily accessible for peer review.**

A. Evidence of a Scholarly Approach to Education

  • A scholarly approach to education is reflected by:

    1. How one undertakes one’s own development as an educator;

    2. Evidence of one’s consistent use of accepted principles and standards for planning and designing educational activities.

To complete this section for the first time, review your information above and consider the primary focus of your educational activities. This area can provide the centerpiece of Section 7. Focal activity that demonstrates a scholarly approach.

  • Describe this activity in 1-2 pages, providing evidence of:

    • Application of sound principles and systematic planning, such as Glassick’s criteria.

    • Use of “best practices” or an accepted model from literature or recognized experts.

    • Use of reflective practice to improve the project or activity.

B. Professional Development in Education

Professional development plays a vital part of improving technique and skills, expanding on formal education, and learning/practicing best practices. Use the Professional Development in Education Grid (*) to list any conferences, certification or degree programs, or other educational professional development activities that you have attended as a learner (not a teacher). Include ONLY those that have made a significant impact on your philosophy or practice as an educator.

(*) All table(s) are located within the primary portfolio Google doc.

PRODUCTS OF EDUCATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP

**NOTE: Sections 7 & 8 on scholarly approach to education and products of educational scholarship are vitally important to promotion as an educator. Although you have included relevant information about your scholarly work under each domain, these two sections allow you to highlight your scholarly approach and compile all products of educational scholarship, so they are easily accessible for peer review.**

A. Publications Related to Education

Provide list with full references. Do not include clinical or basic science research publications. For each item listed, include:

Was it an:

  • Article, Book, or Other (specify)

Was it:

  • Invited, Peer Reviewed, and/or Non Peer Reviewed

List: Full Reference, Impact Factor of Journal, Citation Data (how often the publication has been cited, if available)

B. Workshops and Peer-reviewed/Invited Presentations on Educational Topics

Provide a list with full references. Do not include presentations whose purpose is to report on or teach about clinical or basic science research; include only presentations about education. For each item listed, include:

Was it a:

  • Workshop, Didactic Presentation, Poster, or Other (specify)

Was it:

  • Invited, Peer Reviewed, and/or Non Peer Reviewed

Was it presented:

  • Nationally, Internationally, Regionally, Institutionally, and/or Departmentally

List: Title, Where presented, Audience

C. Other Educational Products

Provide as much information as available. For each item listed, include:

Was it disseminated:

  • Nationally, Internationally, Regionally, Institutionally, and/or Departmentally

List: Description of Product, Evidence of Dissemination

 

D. Educational Grants Funded

List all education related grants. For each grant provide:

  • Title 

  • Your role

  • Funding source:

  • National, International, Regional, Institutional, or Departmental

  • Total direct costs (all years)

  • Dates of funding

  • Description of project