Course Descriptions

Students should check with the Program Coordinator for class meeting times and for possible changes in the scheduling of courses. Courses marked *** are core Rehab Science professional development courses.

RSC 5058 – Anatomy for Rehab Science (6 credits)

Study of gross human anatomy through lecture/laboratory experiences that include cadaver dissection of extremities, head, neck, back, abdomen, thoracic, pelvic regions with correlation to clinical conditions. Cross listed with PT 6058. Offered every Summer.

RSC 5060 – Lower Extremity Anatomy Intensive (2 credits)

Intensive and focused study of lower extremity gross human anatomy for graduate students. The content is presented through lecture and laboratory experiences that include cadaver dissection of Human lower extremities with correlation to clinical conditions. Meets with PT 6058. Offered every Summer.

RSC 5065 – Upper Extremity Anatomy Intensive (2 credits)

Intensive and focused study of upper extremity gross human anatomy for graduate students. The content is presented through lecture and laboratory experiences that include cadaver dissection of Human upper extremities with correlation to clinical conditions. Meets with PT 6058. Offered every Summer.

RSC 5101 – Math Tools for Research Applications in Health, Rehab and Movement (1 credit)

This course is intended to prepare the student entering graduate school for immersion into quantitative research and coursework. Review of mathematical formulas and calculations will be completed for quantitative research approaches in health, rehabilitation and human movement sciences. Application examples and practice problems are the focus of the course. Specifically, application of basic algebra and geometry, solving equations for unknowns, logarithmic transforms, derivatives and integrals, matrix methods, and use of macros in research applications will be mastered using an online format. This course does not replace specific courses in mathematics or statistics. Advanced courses in statistics, instrumentation, and signal processing are commonly required in graduate programs. Computer based. Primarily online. Offered every Spring semester.

*** RSC 5106 – Introduction to Rehabilitation Science (1 credit)

This course will prepare students to think critically about rehabilitation science literature, as well as prepare students to write persuasively on scientific topics. This course will include lecture presentations and discussion/interaction sessions planned jointly by students and faculty. Students will explore the origins of Rehabilitation Science (and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation), including definitions, terminology, core theories, and core and related disciplines; explore the current and evolving status of research in the field and the research agenda; identify key stakeholders, funding agencies and funding mechanisms in rehabilitation science research; demonstrate the ability to engage fellow students in an active learning process on a key rehabilitation science topic; and demonstrate understanding of a key rehabilitation science topic through a written format. Offered every Fall semester.

RSC 5135 - Advanced Biomechanics I: Kinematics (3 credits)

Addresses two fundamental questions in human biomechanics: 1) how to describe movement, and 2) how to measure movement, with an emphasis on three-dimensional techniques. Includes lecture, laboratory exposure, and seminar discussion of basic and applied biomechanics, pathokinesiology, and rehabilitation literature. Class meets with RSC 8135. Course assignments vary for those registered at different levels. Offered Fall semesters of odd-numbered years.

RSC 5200 – Introduction to Neuromodulation (1-3 credits)

This course will provide training in the theory, biophysics and evidence-based application of non-invasive magnetic and electric brain stimulation in humans. Course content will be delivered in three modules: (1) safety and administration of non-invasive brain stimulation, (2) neuromodulation methods, and (3) advanced assessment and modeling techniques. All registered students must take module #1. Testing methods will include various methods to assess intracortical, transcallosal and interhemispheric excitability. Neuromodulation methods presented will include non-invasive and invasive forms of brain stimulation. Hands-on instruction and laboratory applications will be provided for cortical excitability testing using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as well as for other non-invasive forms of brain stimulation. Those enrolled will both administer and receive non-invasive brain stimulation and will be asked to sign a consent form. Specific safety exclusion criteria for receiving non-invasive brain stimulation exist and enrollees who have questions should contact the Division of Rehabilitation Science. Offered Fall semesters of even-numbered years.

RSC 5231 – Clinical Biomechanics (2-5 credits)

Course material covers basic principles of biomechanics and forces and structures internal and external to the body responsible for normal and abnormal human movement. Joint and tissue mechanics, muscle function, task analysis, and gait mechanics are taught through lecture and laboratory practice. Cross listed with PT 6231. Offered every Fall semester.

RSC 5235 – Advanced Biomechanics II: Kinetics (3 credits)

This course examines the forces which create human motion and which are produced within the body as a result of human motion. Using lectures, laboratory experiments, and group discussion we will develop the skills for measuring the kinetics of human motion. Clinical movement assessment as well as exercise, sport, and activities of daily living will be measured and analyzed to describe the transfer of forces within the body. We will develop two-dimensional rigid body dynamics models to describe human kinetics, discuss forward and inverse dynamics solutions, and develop hypotheses to describe whole body and joint kinetics. Class meets with RSC 8235. Offered Spring semesters of even-numbered years.

RSC 5281 – Physiology for Physical Rehabilitation (4 credits)

In-depth presentation of fundamental concepts in exercise physiology/exercise biochemistry related primarily to skeletal muscle, secondarily to cardiovascular system/connective tissue. Exercise/performance-enhancing ergogenic aids. Cross listed with PT 6281. Offered every Fall semester.

RSC 5294 - Independent Study in Rehabilitation Science (1-3 credits)

Independent exploration into significant topics related to Rehabilitation Science. Offered by individual arrangement with faculty. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

*** RSC 5306 – Scientific and Professional Presentation (1 credit)

This course will focus on the process and practice of oral presentation of scientific inquiry and discoveries. These skills are essential for scientists in all disciplines, yet often guidelines for optimal scientific presentation are not taught or practiced in an educational setting. Specific areas to be covered in this course include: presentation intent, audience analysis, timing, content, keys to effective communication, vocal behavior, and important things to avoid. Context will include conference-style platform or podium presentations, poster presentations, and seminar presentation. The course will involve opportunities to prepare and practice presentation skills and receive constructive feedback in a safe, supportive environment. It is appropriate for students from all disciplines and levels of PhD study. Offered Fall semesters of odd years, 2019, 2021.

RSC 5310 – Cardiopulmonary Physiology and Rehabilitation (1-4 credits)

This course is designed to convey foundational information regarding human basic physiology and more advanced integrative physiology to provide the student a broad range of knowledge on how the human body works at rest, exercise and as we age. Basic cell physiology which serves the human body’s infrastructure for function in different cell types for various organ systems will be discussed with the major emphasis of this course being on the human body as a system. Along these lines, most of the content will relate to integrative physiology, as our systems are often redundant in regulating homeostasis. The objective of this course is to prepare the student for the study of pathophysiologic changes within the human body. Cross listed with PT 6282. Offered every Spring semester.

RSC 5402 – The Shoulder in Sports Rehabilitation Science (3 credits)

This online course is for students who are interested in investigating the biomechanical and epidemiological aspects of the shoulder in athletics. The course will explore the unique demands placed on the shoulder in sports that involve throwing, swimming, swinging, and bodily impacts. The course begins with an investigation into sport-specific biomechanics, pathomechanics, and epidemiology and progresses to applied problem solving for rehabilitation and research scenarios. Offered Spring and Summer semesters.

RSC 5814 - Age, Exercise, and Rehabilitation (2 credits)

Overview of normal physiological responses to exercise in the elderly. Comparison of exercise-induced responses of the various physiological systems throughout the aging process. Focus on the importance of exercise from a rehabilitation perspective. Offered Fall semesters of even-numbered years.

RSC 5841 – Applied Data Acquisition and Processing (3 credits)

This course will introduce students to collecting and processing biomedical time series data. Students will gain experience using data acquisition hardware common in many laboratories, as well as related software for acquisition of the data and digital signal processing. Data sources will include electroencephalography (EEG), electromyography (EMG), wearable sensors, and data from other systems based on the background and interests of students in the class. The overall goal of this course is to provide students with the necessary fundamental skills to run a successful experiment, troubleshoot errors, and produce high-quality data sets. Offered Spring semesters of odd-numbered years.

RSC 5901 – Scholarly Inquiry in Health Sciences (4 credits)

This course will explore how research evidence is developed, disseminated, and utilized in health sciences. A qualitative/quantitative scholarly project proposal will be required. Students will critique studies/peer proposals. Cross listed with OT 7201. Offered every Spring semester.

*** RSC 8106 – Critical Analysis of Scientific Literature (2 credits)

This course will focus on the process of critical review, appraisal and synthesis of scientific literature. Overview of organizing and writing literature reviews for a traditional dissertation, systematic reviews, and peer review for scientific manuscripts will be included. The course will involve substantive review of the literature and writing in your anticipated area of dissertation work. Offered Spring semesters of odd years, 2019, 2021.

RSC 8130 - Current Literature (1-3 credits)

Review of current literature in the area of rehabilitation science. Offered by individual arrangement with faculty. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RSC 8135 – Human Kinematics (3 credits)

This course is designed to address two fundamental questions in human biomechanics: 1) how to describe movement, and 2) how to measure movement, with an emphasis on three-dimensional techniques. The course will include lecture, laboratory exposure, and seminar discussion of basic and applied biomechanics, pathokinesiology, and rehabilitation literature. Class meets with RSC 5135. Offered Fall semesters of odd-numbered years.

RSC 8170 - Special Topics in Rehabilitation Science (1-3 credits)

Advanced topics in Rehabilitation Science with papers required. Offered by individual arrangement with faculty. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RSC 8185 - Problems in Rehabilitation Science (1-3 credits)

Supervised research experience in a selected problem in rehabilitation science. Offered by individual arrangement with faculty. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RSC 8188 - Teaching Practicum (1-3 credits)

Supervised experience in teaching and evaluation with development of skills in the effective use of instructional materials in lecture and lab courses. Students can expect to: create learning objectives for teaching unit(s); conduct a thorough review of current literature on topic; prepare classroom presentations; deliver classroom presentations; consult with faculty for feedback prior to presentation; compose test questions; proctor examinations. Offered by individual arrangement with faculty. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

RSC 8192 – Essentials of Rehabilitation Research (3 credits)

The goals of this course are to develop abilities to critically evaluate the peer-reviewed literature. It will also enable students to identify and apply appropriate statistical procedures and interpret the meaning of statistical analyses. Finally, it will give students an opportunity to present the aims, methods, intended analyses, and preliminary results of their own research. Additionally, students will meet individually for 2h every month with the lecturer to work on the Method section of a paper related to their PhD project. This paper will be critically reviewed and graded as end-evaluation for this class. Cross listed with PT 6293. Offered every Fall semester.

*** RSC 8206 – Grant Writing (2 credits)

This course will focus on the process of applying for an individual National Institutes of Health (NIH) pre-doctoral research training fellowship. Overview of NIH Program Announcements and NIH SF424 individual fellowship application guide will be included. The course will involve substantive writing of the components of the NIH fellowship, with emphasis on the student and training components. Offered Fall semesters of even years, 2018, 2020.

RSC 8235 – Human Kinetics (3 credits)

This course examines the forces which create human motion and which are produced within the body as a result of human motion. Human Kinetics draws upon basic biomechanics principles to uncover solutions for kinetics problems as well as the sensitivity of those solutions to measurement errors, assumptions, and limitations of the solution formulations. Using lectures, laboratory experiments, and group discussion we will develop the skills for measuring and analyzing the kinetics of human motion. Clinical movement assessment as well as exercise, sport, and activities of daily living will be measured and analyzed to describe the transfer of forces within the body. We will develop two-dimensional rigid body dynamics models to describe human kinetics, discuss forward and inverse dynamics solutions, and develop hypotheses to describe whole body and joint kinetics. Class meets with RSC 5235. Offered Spring semesters of even-numbered years.

RSC 8282 - Neurorehabilitation (3 credits)

Fundamental principles of neurophysiology, neurology, motor control, and motor learning as a basis for therapeutic intervention in motor dysfunction. Course cross-listed with PT 6286. Offered every Fall semester.

*** RSC 8306 – Peer Review and Publication (2 credits)

This course will focus on the process of publication in the scientific literature, with emphasis on publication of original research. Overview of organizing and writing for publication and the peer review process for scientific manuscripts will be included. The course will involve substantive writing practice in your anticipated area of scientific inquiry. Offered Spring semesters of even years, 2018, 2020.

RSC 8333 – Full-Time Equivalent Master’s (1 credit)

8333 is a one-credit registration option for eligible Master’s students who must certify full-time status to be in compliance with requirements of the University and/or external agencies (e.g. employment as a graduate assistant; loan deferment). Students eligible for 8444 can be employed in one of the low-tuition/low-fringe job classes.

RSC 8444 – Full-Time Equivalent Doctoral (1 credit)

8444 is a one-credit registration option for eligible doctoral students who must certify full-time status to be in compliance with requirements of the University and/or external agencies (e.g. employment as a graduate assistant; loan deferment). Students eligible for 8444 can be employed in one of the low-tuition/low-fringe job classes.

RSC 8666 - Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits (1-18 credits)

RSC 8777 - Thesis Credits: Master’s (10 credits)

RSC 8888 - Thesis Credits: Doctoral (24 credits)