Diabetes T32 Research Training Program

In existence since 1977, the post-doctoral training program in diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Minnesota has prepared MDs and PhDs for successful research careers in academic medicine. This preparation has centered upon the critical interaction between the trainee and the research mentor.

All mentors in this program have national or international reputations in their respective areas and have strong track records in mentoring. Our faculty have expertise in cellular metabolism and genetics; endocrinology and signaling; neurobiology and appetite regulation of obesity; stem cell biology, autoimmunity, and β-cell biology; and clinical aspects of endocrine disease.

Trainees enter the program after they have either completed a residency program in internal medicine or received a PhD in a biological science at a major research University. Graduates of the program are established at Universities and research institutions worldwide.

Inquiries may be made via email to the Program Director, Dr. Betsy Seaquist seaqu001@umn.edu.

Track Record of Success

During the almost 40 years the training program has been in existence supporting MDs and PhDs in academic medicine research, more than 100 trainees have entered and successfully completed the program.

Over the last decade, our program faculty has mentored more than 135 fellows with 20 supported by the T32 program. Eight of these 20 fellows remained in academic medicine and one now has a scientific career in industry. Four of them are now the Principal Investigator on their own NIH grants. Since 2010, T32 supported fellows have produced 11 original manuscripts; 7 of which they were first author.

Mentor & Trainee Expectations

The core of our research training program in diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism is the close interaction between the highly successful faculty mentors and their trainees. Trainees are given the freedom to choose their mentor and research focus. We aim to prepare our trainees for an independent research career, with the mentor working to ensure that trainees become experts in critical thinking, effective communication, and the responsible conduct of research.

The mentor and trainee work together to develop an annual career development plan for the trainee. Through this process they identify objectives that will help the fellow achieve his/her long term career goals, devise strategies to accomplish these objectives, develop a timeline for when the strategies will be employed, and define the outcomes measure that will be used to determine if the objective has been successfully accomplished.

At the beginning of the training period, both the mentor and trainee review and sign agreements that define the program’s expectations for each of them. These agreements document plans for formal meetings, grant submissions, and attendance at relevant seminars, journal clubs, and conferences. 

Mentor Expectations

Mentor Expectations

  1. Assist your fellow to:
    • Develop his/her career goals, associated near-term objectives, and specific objectives for each training grant-supported year.
    • Identify what strategies (e.g. experiences, training, etc.) will facilitate objective achievement.
    • Identify how research experiences and training will be acquired.
    • Develop an annual timeline showing when research experiences and/or training will occur and when objectives will be completed.
    • Develop plans for a grant submission to an external funding agency by the final year of training (such as an individual training grant or a career development award).
  2. Establish regularly scheduled meeting times with the fellow to review progress and discuss career development.
  3. Assure that scholars spend at least 40 hours a week participating in training, research, and career development.
  4. Attend departmental research seminars, journal clubs, and research presentations by other fellows in this program with your fellow on a regular basis.

Trainee Expectations

Trainee Expectations

  1. Work with your mentor to:
    • Develop his/her career goals, associated near-term objectives, and specific objectives for each training grant-supported year.
    • Identify what strategies (e.g. experiences, training, etc.) will facilitate objective achievement.
    • Identify how research experiences and training will be acquired.
    • Develop an annual timeline showing when research experiences and/or training will occur and when objectives will be completed.
    • Develop plans for a grant submission to an external funding agency (such as an individual training grant or a career development award).
  2. Establish regularly scheduled meeting times with the mentor to review progress and discuss career development.
  3. Spend at least 40 hours a week participating in training, research, and career development activities.
  4. Attend departmental and divisional research seminars (for example, city-wide endocrine conference), endocrine journal clubs, research presentations by other fellows in this program, and laboratory meetings regularly.
  5. Present your research plan to the faculty at the beginning of your first year of support and present your results to the faculty at the end of your training period.
  6. Participate in the seminar series for T32 scholars that present topics in responsible conduct in research, research ethics, career development, and presentation skills.

Application Process

Application Process

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis based on the availability of trainee slots on the grant.

All individuals supported by the training grant must be US citizens or noncitizen nationals (permanent residents). Students on temporary or student visas are not eligible.

Individuals must have successfully completed a residency program in internal medicine in the United States or received a PhD in a biological science at a major research University. Applicants must identify a mentor at the University of Minnesota with whom they plan to do a post-doctoral research fellowship in the area of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism.

There are 2 paths to obtain T32 funding:

  1. MDs seeking to combine clinical and research training may enter our ACGME accredited Fellowship Program.
  2. PhDs or MDs interested mainly in research training may enter directly into the T32 Program.

APPLYING
We are currently accepting applications for a November 2020 start date. Applications must be received by September 1, 2020

Application Form
You will be asked to provide the following:

  1. 1-2 page personal statement of career goals and research interests
  2. Curriculum vitae (CV) or NIH biosketch
  3. Transcripts for all University/Colleges attended (unofficial permitted)
  4. One (1) letter of recommendation from the proposed mentor. This letter should indicate the mentor’s commitment to the training of the applicant and outline the project the applicant will be doing in the mentor’s laboratory.
  5. One (1) additional letter of recommendation
  6. Current biosketch of proposed mentor

Contact Us
Program Coordinator
Sarah Chapeau
chape044@umn.edu

Faculty Research Areas

Faculty Research Areas

Diabetes and Endocrinology research is a priority at the University of Minnesota. Our Training Program brings together top faculty researchers from five endocrinology-related domains:

  1. Cellular Metabolism and Genetics
  2. Endocrinology and Signaling
  3. Neurobiology and Appetite Regulation of Obesity
  4. Stem Cell Biology, Autoimmunity, and β-cell Biology
  5. Clinical Aspects of Endocrine Disease

Our faculty are highly experienced with national or international reputations in their respective areas, and have strong track records in mentoring. More than half of them hold the rank of full Professor.

Cellular Metabolism & Genetics

Endocrinology & Signaling

Neurobiology & Appetite Regulation of Obesity

Stem Cell Biology, Autoimmunity & β-cell Biology

Clinical Aspects of Endocrine Disease