Michael Przybilla, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics

Michael Przybilla

Contact Info

przy0059@umn.edu

Mailing Address:
Pediatrics, Dept of
MMC 391 Mayo
8391A (Campus Delivery Code)
420 Delaware St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics

Faculty Member, Division of Genetics and Metabolism

Fellowship in the Lysosomal Disease Network, University of Minnesota Health

Postdoctoral Assistant, University of Minnesota Medical Center


Fellowship, NIH/NINDS, Lysosomal Disease Network, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

PhD, Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology and Genetics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Summary

Dr. Michael Przybilla is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Genetics & Metabolism. He graduated from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities in 2012 with a BS in Biology. He received his PhD in Molecular, Cellular, Developmental Biology & Genetics at the University of Minnesota in 2018. From 2019-2022 he was a postdoctoral assistant in the Gene Therapy and Diagnostics Laboratory, working with Dr. Chester B. Whitley. His work focused on the development and characterization of murine models of lysosomal diseases and the development of novel therapies for such diseases. He joined the Department of Pediatrics Faculty in 2022.

Research

Research Summary/Interests

Dr. Przybilla's research has focused on the development of animal models of lysosomal diseases and has progressed into the development and testing of novel therapies for such diseases including enzyme replacement therapy, small molecule chaperones, gene therapy, and gene editing. Currently, his research is focused on developing a gene therapy that can potentially serve as a platform technology to treat multiple lysosomal diseases. Additionally, Dr. Przybilla is collaborating with several research groups to test conduct preclinical studies for potential therapeutics for several lysosomal diseases.

Interests include: Therapeutic development for genetic diseases, with a focus on lysosomal diseases.