Charles Lewis
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Credentials
MD

Assistant Professor
Biography

Bio

I obtained a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Psychology from Rice University in 2005, followed by my Doctor of Medicine from the University of Texas Medical School at Houston in 2010. I completed clinical training in Psychiatry (2014) and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (2016) at the Mayo Clinic School of Graduate Medical Education, where I twice served as Chief Resident. I then undertook a two-year clinical research fellowship, the Clinician-Investigator Training Program, with a focus on neuromodulation in adolescent mood disorders and suicidal behavior. I joined the University of Minnesota Medical School faculty in 2019.My research focuses on the neurobiological correlates of suicidal behavior in adolescents with mood disorders, with the aims of improving risk assessment and identifying novel treatment approaches. I am also involved in ongoing projects utilizing noninvasive brain stimulation, including repetitive TMS, theta burst stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), as treatment interventions for children and adolescents with depression. I am also the recipient of a 2018 NARSAD Young Investigator Grant from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, which will support my work in studying state-dependent impairment in cortical inhibition and network connectivity in adolescents with suicidal behavior.I have also presented both nationally and internationally at over 35 conferences.

Research Summary

Dr. Lewis' research focuses on the neurobiological correlates of suicidal behavior in adolescents with mood disorders, with the aims of improving risk assessment and identifying novel treatment approaches. His previous work has found impaired cortical inhibition, measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and alterations in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in youth with suicidal behavior. Dr. Lewis is also involved in ongoing projects utilizing noninvasive brain stimulation, including repetitive TMS, theta burst stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), as treatment interventions for children and adolescents with depression.