Ask MedEd

Student Academic Progression

Medical school is designed as a 4-year program. Some students may follow a different timeline for a variety of reasons: personal, health, and/or academic. The Office of Student Affairs works closely with students to support them on their own path toward completion of their degree. All student progress is governed by the school's policies and procedures.

Academic Advising

Starting with the class of 2023, every student is assigned an Academic Advisor at the beginning of their medical school journey. This person is tasked with supporting students in their academic progression, the logistics of navigating medical school, and connecting students to resources.  

How is my Academic Advisor different from my Faculty Advisor?

Your Academic Advisor, as a student affairs professional, is focused on the specific details of carrying out your academic plan and supporting you in completion of that plan. Your Faculty Advisor, as a clinical faculty member, is focused on your career and professional development as a future physician.

Does my Academic Advisor share information with my Faculty Advisor?

As your support team, Academic Advisors and Faculty Advisors will share “need to know” information with each other in line with FERPA regulations. Any changes in your academic plan and any academic information would be considered “need to know” for supporting you, so we will communicate about that. If you divulge personal information that is not considered “need to know,” then we will not share that unless you give us permission to do so.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Your Academic Advisor

Enrollment & Registration

Students are registered differently in medical school compared to most undergraduate colleges. In year 1 and 2, we will manually register you for the courses you’re taking that term; in year 3 and 4, you will go through a scheduling process which adds courses in MEdIS (student information system), then an automatic process runs to get you registered for those courses.

How do I see what I’m registered for?

The best way to see this is in MyU. In your “Academics” tab, you can see the courses you’re officially registered for. If at any point that doesn’t look accurate, reach out to your Academic Advisor who can look into it and work with you and the Registrar’s office to fix the issue.

I am a year 3/4 student and have a hold on my record. I am scheduled for a course coming up. Can I still attend that if I have the hold?

No. In order to participate in courses, you need to be registered for the course, not just scheduled for it. The Registrar lets you know well in advance of your course beginning that you have a hold preventing registration. Resolve the hold ASAP to avoid being unable to participate in your scheduled rotations.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Your Academic Advisor

Leaves of Absence (LOAs)

Students are able to take time off from medical school for personal, health, or academic reasons. Anytime this time off results in a full semester without enrollment, it is considered a leave of absence.

Who do I contact if I am thinking about taking time off?

You can either reach out to your Faculty or Academic Advisor to start the conversation. If you would like a discussion about whether or not to take time off, your Faculty Advisor can help think through the pros and cons and other options in your overall career development. Your Academic Advisor can help with the steps you’ll need to take to make any changes to your academic plan and get approval of any leaves of absence.

Do I have to take a full semester off or can I take a few weeks if that’s all I need?

This is really dependent upon the stage you’re at in your medical school journey, but often we can accommodate either option depending upon what is needed for your situation.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Your Academic Advisor

Deceleration of Academic Schedule

Students are able to take a lightened course load in years 1 and 2, called a “deceleration,” for personal, health, or academic reasons.

Who do I contact if I’m thinking about decelerating?

You can either reach out to your Faculty or Academic Advisor to start the conversation. If you would like a discussion about whether or not to decelerate, your Faculty Advisor can help think through the pros and cons and other options in your overall career and professional development. Your Academic Advisor can help with the steps you’ll need to take to create your academic plan and get approval of the plan. 

How many classes do I take at a time for a deceleration?

This is dependent upon each individual student’s needs. You will have a conversation with your Academic Advisor to go through the specifics and create an academic plan that works for you.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Your Academic Advisor

Committee on Student Scholastic Standing (COSSS)

The COSSS is a standing Committee of the Executive Faculty and reports to the Executive Faculty and the Faculty Assembly. The responsibilities of the Committee on Student Scholastic Standing (COSSS) are: to ensure that the students of the Medical School have met the requirements for awarding the M.D. degree; to monitor each student's progress through Medical School; and to ensure that the work of the Committee has been conducted properly, providing fairness to each student. To this end, the Committee determines guidelines for student academic standing, and monitors each student’s progress toward the Doctor of Medicine degree. You can learn about the Committee and its policies and procedures here.

Who is the Committee composed of?

The COSSS is composed of 15 faculty members broadly representing the basic science and clinical areas, two student representatives (one voting representative and one alternate), and the non-voting ex officio member the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. Other members of the Medical Education staff may be invited as consultants or guest members as needed. Faculty members are nominated by the Chair of the Committee with input from the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and appointed by the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education.

For what reasons would a student be required to go before the Committee?

Student issues brought to the attention of the COSSS may or may not require the individual student to meet directly with the Committee. If appearance petition is required, a written notice will be sent by the Chair of the Committee. The Associate Dean for Students on the Duluth Campus is copied on the notice if the student matriculated in Duluth. Issues that are brought before the Committee for which the Committee deliberates and makes decisions include (but are not limited to): Requests for a decelerated program or extension of grad date, Requests for leaves of absence, Failure to make satisfactory academic progress, Failing any basic science or clinical course, Any failure to pass any USMLE exam, and Professionalism concerns.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Michael Kim, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, mikekim@umn.edu, 612-625-5180

Flexible MD

The Flexible MD program at the University of Minnesota Medical School gives medical students the opportunity to participate in experiences not available in the regular curriculum, that meet their individual needs and allow them to better serve communities and patients. The program allows students to take leaves of absence and extend their grad date beyond the normal four years in order to pursue these experiences. You can find more information here

Who is eligible for Flex MD and what are the requirements?

Any current med student in Good Academic standing is eligible to participate. The main requirement is for a student to propose an experience they are ready to participate in that they feel is an enhancement to their MD degree. Example experiences include (but are not limited to): dual degrees, research, service learning, additional degrees, and global health experiences.

What is the process for participating in the Flexible MD?

The process begins with the submission of a proposal application. Upon submission the student meets with an academic advisor and financial aid, the application is then reviewed by a Flexible MD Oversight Committeewho reviews and approves the applications and offers feedback to the student as needed. Once participating, students are required to submit progress reports, and once the experience is done, students must submit a final report.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Scott Davenport, Director, Students Affairs, daven016@umn.edu, 612-624-8601

Grad Date Extensions

Students are able to take a lightened course load in years 3 and 4, called a “graduation extension,” for personal, health, or academic reasons.

Who do I contact if I’m thinking about extending my graduation date?

You can either reach out to your Faculty or Academic Advisor to start the conversation. If you would like a discussion about whether or not to extend your graduation, your Faculty Advisor can help think through the pros and cons and other options in your overall career and professional development. Your Academic Advisor can help with the steps you’ll need to take to request the extension. 

How will extending my graduation affect my chances of matching to a residency program?

It depends on many factors; you are a whole person, and extending your graduation is only one part of your medical school narrative when you apply to residency. If you would like to discuss more specifics, reach out to your Faculty Advisor. They know you well and understand the residency application process; they can give you more information about the impact an extension would have on your competitiveness for matching.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Your Academic Advisor

Course and USMLE Exam Failures

If students encounter challenges passing their courses or USMLE exams, the Office of Student Affairs will support them through the remediation process. 

What happens if I don’t pass?

Your Academic Advisor and Faculty Advisor will reach out to you to provide you with support and next steps. Each situation is considered individually and holistically; generally, students are provided the options to remediate either by re-examination or by retaking the course in the case of a course failure. To move forward in this process, students will make a request to the Committee on Student Scholastic Standing; your Academic Advisor will guide you through this process.

How will this failure affect my chances of matching to a residency program?

It depends on many factors; you are a whole person, and this is only one part of your medical school narrative when you apply to residency. If you would like to discuss more specifics, reach out to your Faculty Advisor. They know you well and understand the residency application process; they can give you more information about the impact this will have on your competitiveness for matching. 

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Your Academic Advisor

Student Wellness and Wellbeing

Wellbeing has far reaching effects on health, professional success, and overall happiness and additionally has been tied to capacity for empathy and resistance to burnout. The University of Minnesota Medical School places a strong value on student, staff and faculty wellbeing and is striving to engage our community through innovative programming, incentives and scholarship allowing them the tools and vision to incorporate wellbeing concepts into daily practice for their own benefit and that of future patients.

Counseling Services

Confidential Bridging Counseling Services (CBCs) is a FREE and CONFIDENTIAL short-term counseling opportunity for medical students.  If a longer term counseling option would be helpful, the CBC counselor will refer (Bridge) you to on-campus or community resources.

Is this really free and confidential?

There is no charge, student service fees or insurance billing involved.  Dr. Reilly-Spong does not share your information with medical school faculty, staff or deans.  As a postdoctoral psychology license applicant, Dr. Reilly-Spong does meet with Dr. Scott Slattery, LP on a regular basis for clinical supervision, which means your information is shared with him.  However, the rules of confidentiality in the Bridging office also extend to Dr. Slattery in his role of clinical supervisor. You will review the limits of confidentiality carefully and be able to ask questions of Dr. Reilly-Spong before you share information.  

How do I make an appointment?  

You can select an appointment slot at this link: https://z.umn.edu/Bridging or email maryanne@umn.edu if the available appointment slots don’t fit your schedule.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Maryanne Reilly-Spong, PhD, maryanne@umn.edu

Career and Professional Development

Getting into medical school is an amazing accomplishment, but we all know that the education of a physician does not end here (and really never does end). Student's professional development is led by Faculty Advisors, who guide students throughout their med school carrer anf help them understand themselves, learn about different specialty and career options, and prepare them for the residency match.

Faculty Advising

Faculty Advisors are a primary resource for students to help support professional and career development needs.  Upon matriculation into the school, each student is assigned a Faculty Advisor who will guide them throughout their medical school career. They are not specialty-specific mentors but provide longer-term advising and support. The aims of the program include: Build longitudinal relationships among students and faculty advisors, Build peer communities that foster reflection and growth, Facilitate students in meeting their academic and career development needs, Facilitate students' personal and professional development, Continually build advisors' knowledge and skills to better meet student needs, and share new knowledge in scholarly work. Learn more about the program and who the advisors are here.

Who is my Faculty Advisor?

Your Faculty Advisor is assigned to specific House.  During Orientation, you will meet your Faculty Advisor. Also, you will receive direct communication from your Faculty Advisor throughout the academic year.

What can I expect when I meet with my Faculty Advisor?

Your Faculty Advisor is a source of support and knowledge who will help you throughout your medical school journey.  They care about you and are invested in your success. Group and individual meetings will address timely topics of interest at key times throughout all four years of medical school related to career and professional development as well as other relevant topics

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Maija Braaten, Faculty Advising and Career & Residency Match Coordinator, mbraaten@umn.edu

The Residency Match Process

The Match Process begins near the end of the third year of medical school and ends on Match Day where students discover where they will spend their residency.  Many steps are involved, including researching programs, reflection, requesting Letters of Recommendation, developing personal statements, completing applications, interviewing with programs, rank order lists, and more. You can find general information here, and specific resources for the matching process here.

What is a Match?

“The Match” is the process by which medical students get into a residency. Senior medical students do not make independent agreements with residency programs to train at their program. Instead, applicants and residency programs are “matched” with each other using ranking lists that both create. The Match was developed to provide an impartial venue for matching applicants' preferences for residency positions with program directors' preferences for applicants.

There are actually four different matching programs: The National Residency Matching Program (NRMP), the San Francisco Match, the American Urological Associate Match (AUA or Urology Match), and the Military Match. The SF, Urology, and Military Matches are often referred to as “early matches” because they have accelerated schedules compared to the NRMP Match, which is often referred to as the “main match”. Each Match covers different specialties: the SF Match matches applicants into Ophthalmology, the AUA (Urology) Match matches applicants into Urology, and the NRMP Match matches applicants into all the other specialties. Specialties are not repeated in each match, meaning if you want to match into Urology, the AUA Match is the only match that matches into Urology, and if you want to match into Family Medicine, the NRMP Match is the only match that matches that specialty.

When do I apply to residency and Match?

The process of applying is broken into three distinct phases or time periods covering a student’s late third year and all of fourth year. Each of these phases has its own needs and requirements for the applicant. Phase 1 takes place in the Spring of a students 3rd year and continues into and through the Summer of their 4th year and is a time of preparation, gathering materials, researching specialty and specific programs, meeting with letter writers and mentors in their specialty, meeting with individual specialty departments, and preparing their CV. Phase 2 takes place in the fall and winter of a student's 4th year and consists of applying to programs, tracking supporting application materials, communicating with programs, and interviewing. And finally, Phase 3 takes place in late winter and spring of the student 4th year and is highlighted by more interviewing , creating a rank order list, and matching!!!

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Maija Braaten, Faculty Advising and Career & Residency Match Coordinator, resapp@umn.edu

Career Development Resources

The Career Guidance & The Match website has a wealth of information to help throughout the process of applying to residencies and matching, including: videos, guides, data and key links.

What things should I be doing now to lead to matching into my preferred specialty and residency?

Work closely with your Faculty Advisor and also take advantage of resources throughout your medical education.  Go to events sponsored by Interest Groups for specialties you are considering. We highly encourage students to use the Careers in Medicine online resource during all four years to help gain insight into specialties and how they fit with your personality, values, skills, and interests.  It also is an excellent resource to research residency programs. Access it by using your AAMC credentials and enter the Careers in Medicine portal here

Being part of a large academic health center provides the Medical School with all the resources necessary for students to explore their specialties and career options. Students can visit our Specialties Page to find information and resources for each specialty. All our specialties have volunteer Specialty Experts who are available for students to reach out to in order to learn more about their specialty and to learn about resources. Students are also able to reach out to departments directly. The department’s, and especially the Residency Director’s door are always open and students are encouraged to reach out.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Maija Braaten, Faculty Advising and Career & Residency Match Coordinator, resapp@umn.edu

Specialty Experts

As you consider various specialties, it is always recommended to speak with Specialty Experts to receive feedback and advice.  Sometimes your Faculty Advisor will be an expert in the specialty. If you are interested in learning more about specialties outside of your Faculty Advisor’s expertise, you should reach out to a Specialty Expert listed here.

When should I reach out to meet with a Specialty Expert for career advising or to obtain a letter of recommendation?

It varies by medical student, purpose of the contact, and career interests.  Speaking with a Faculty Advisor first is always recommended before contacting a Specialty Expert or Department Chair. Typically many students meet with a Specialty Expert at some during the third year to discuss career advising and to request letters of recommendation.  Specialties such as Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Surgery require a letter of recommendation for the Department Chair as part of applying to residency programs. Meeting with the Department Chair shortly after completing a rotation is wise in order to acquire the strongest letter of recommendation.

How do I prepare to meet with a Specialty Expert?

Being prepared involves spending time reflecting on your strengths, goals, and interests as well as forming questions in advance.  It can be helpful to have a draft of a curriculum vitae available to share and discuss with a Specialty Expert as well as other information to help with assessing competitiveness.  Showing genuine interest and enthusiasm as well as investing time preparing for the meeting always ensures a positive experience. Click here for a frequently updated list of points of contact for diverse specialties at UMN Medical School.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Maija Braaten, Faculty Advising and Career & Residency Match Coordinator, resapp@umn.edu

Policies and Procedures

The Twin Cities campus of the medical school maintains policies governing all year 1-4 medical students on the Twin Cities Campus of the University of Minnesota Medical School. In addition, all students are also required to adhere to all main University of Minnesota Policies. The policies below are part of the overall policies for the TC campus, they are highlighted because they are "owned" and tracked by the Student Affairs Office.

Year 1 and 2 Exam Rescheduling

Medical students are expected to put their studies as a top priority. The Medical School recognizes, however, that students (and physicians) must balance their strong commitment to medicine with their commitments to families and communities, and that they must engage in the self-care practices that will allow them to be healthy and fully engaged with patients and with the profession of medicine. However, students may seek permission to reschedule an exam in order to participate in another personal or professional activity. See the  Year 1 and 2 Exam Rescheduling Request Form for full details and criteria.

What is the procedure to reschedule an exam?

Complete the Year 1 and 2 Exam Rescheduling Request Form and submit it to Dr Michael Kim (mikekim@umn.edu). Provide any relevant documentation, such as documentation from a health care provider for an illness.

  1. Submit the petition as far in advance of the exam as possible.
  2. You will be notified via email as to whether or not your request has been approved

The Assistant Dean of Student Affairs (Dr. Michael Kim), in cooperation with the Director of Learner Development (Dr. Scott Slattery), will determine the final decision on each written request and will be involved with the rescheduled exam details when approved.

All rescheduled exams should take place through the Office of Medical Education with the Course Manager in charge of finding an exam space during an ILT time. If multiple students need to retake the same exam, the test will be administered to all at the same time. If a student is to take the exam at the Disability Resource Center, the same time frame applies.

If I do reschedule an exam, what is the timeline to take it?

Any rescheduled exam must be taken within 7 calendar days of the original exam date unless the student is hospitalized or has been deemed to have extenuating circumstances determined by the Office of Medical Education. If more than one exam has to be rescheduled (excluding lab practical exams) then they also must take place not more than 7 calendar days from the original date of the exam. 

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Michael Kim, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, mikekim@umn.edu 

Rotational Duty Hours

Student duty hours are defined as all clinical and academic activities related to the medical student experience during a rotation. Duty hour standards need to integrate time for students to have a significant clinical experience, to prepare for course assessments, and to obtain sufficient rest to maintain well-being. Ideally, the planning of duty hours should be a collaboration between the student and the supervising faculty and/or resident. See full Duty Hours policy for specifics and procedures.

I need to have specific days off for X reason, can I request these from my rotation?

Students are responsible for submitting requests to Clerkship Directors or their designee for changes in scheduled days off. Students should submit these requests as far enough in advance as possible so the rotation and site can plan schedules accordingly.

How many "days off" do I get during a year 3 or 4 clinical rotation?

Clerkships will schedule students to have at least two consecutive days off, on average, every other week and at least one day off every seven days (Note: Official University holidays count as a day off under this policy. Example: Memorial Day is a University holiday; students may be required to work the other six days in that week. Students, with the consent of the clerkship director, can work a University holiday in exchange for another day off during that week). In addition, clerkships will schedule at least two half-weekdays of Independent Learning Time (IL T) for every 4 weeks. This time is to be scheduled during regular business hours, M-F and will be scheduled as early as possible to allow for advance planning. See full Duty Hours policy for specifics, procedures, and additional clerkship requirements.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Michael Kim, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, mikekim@umn.edu

Attendance and Excused Absences

An excellent and comprehensive medical education requires in-person, active engagement among students, patients and faculty. It is important to provide unambiguous expectations for active student participation in the educational program in a manner that is respectful of and adaptable to unexpected events and faculty responsibilities, and allows students to plan their schedules responsibly. Students are expected to attend all scheduled classes and examinations, either in person or online, and to participate fully in small group sessions, laboratory exercises and service learning experiences. In accordance with that policy, attendance is required at the following Medical School educational activities unless the course director has otherwise exempted students with advance notification. See full Attendance Requirements for Courses, Clerkships and Examsfor details.

Are there accepted specific reasons for which an excused absence will be supported/approved?

The following are the only reasons for which an excused absence will be supported by the Office of Medical Education, and where makeup work will be provided (course directors have the discretion to allow excused absences for other reasons but are under no obligation to do so, nor to provide make up work)

  • Religious holidays and restrictions—Students will be allowed to change exam date for significant religious holidays and other days with work restrictions.
  • Illness, personal crisis, or family emergency—Students are allowed to reschedule exams due to their own illness, the illness of a family member or another family emergency, or personal crisis. Documentation from a health care provider is required in the case of illness, documentation from appropriate sources will be required for emergency/crisis situations.
  • Examination days for Step 2CK and Step 2CS (including one travel day for Step 2CS), although students are encouraged to schedule these exams during their weeks off.

I am a 1st or 2nd year med student and have a personal or professional activity that is going to interfere with my ability to sit for an exam at the specific exam date/time, can I reschedule the exam?

Medical students are expected to put their studies as a top priority. The Medical School recognizes, however, that students (and physicians) must balance their strong commitment to medicine with their commitments to families and communities, and that they must engage in the self-care practices that will allow them to be healthy and fully engaged with patients and with the profession of medicine. This procedure outlines when students may reschedule an exam in order to participate in another personal or professional activity.

Procedure:

Complete the Year 1 and 2 Exam Rescheduling Request Form and submit it to Dr Michael Kim (mikekim@umn.edu). Provide any relevant documentation, such as documentation from a health care provider for an illness.

  1. Submit the petition as far in advance of the exam as possible.
  2. You will be notified via email as to whether or not your request has been approved

See the  Year 1 and 2 Exam Rescheduling Request Form for full details and criteria.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Michael Kim, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, mikekim@umn.edu 

Student Events and Programming

A student's medical school career is marked by milestones and achievements. Our annual events allow us the opportunity to reflect with pride on these achievements and recognize the amazing accomplishments of our students.

New Student Orientation

Orientation brings the whole incoming first year class together on campus for the first time and takes place in the days prior to the first week of classes (end of August). Programming during Orientation includes onboarding sessions, student and faculty panels, socials and student-hosted activities, and opportunities to get to know your future classmates. Orientation is wrapped up with the White Coat Ceremony, where students are coated by their faculty advisors in front of family and guests.

What do I need to do before arriving for Orientation? 

Once accepted to the medical school, make sure you’re regularly checking the Next Steps page of the website. We will continue to update with specific Orientation details throughout the summer.  

How many tickets do I get for the White Coat Ceremony?

There are no tickets for the ceremony, and students may invite as many guests as they would like.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Rachel Rudeen, rude0105@umn.edu

Commencement

The Medical School’s ceremony for graduating fourth year medical students held annually at the conclusion of the Spring semester.

How many tickets do I get for Commencement?

There are no tickets for the ceremony, and students may invite as many guests as they would like. 

I need seating or other accommodations for myself or a guest, how can I request that? 

Please email Rachel Rudeen (rude0105@umn.edu) at least one month prior to the ceremony. 

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Rachel Rudeen, rude0105@umn.edu

Transitions Series

A series of sessions offered throughout the spring semester of a student's second year of medical school. The series is intended to prepare students for their first clinical rotation, and sessions are designed to assist students in not only learning in the clinical environment, but to also thrive in it. Topics in panel discussions, hands on experience, and presentations, include: The student's role on the team; Preparing for the SHELF exam; Recognizing and reporting harassment & mistreatment; Receiving and using feedback; Learning from your patients; Adapting oral presentations; and much more.

I’m in lane [X], what dates am I required to attend? 

All dates, times, and locations can be found on the Transitions site. All sessions list if they are required or optional. 

I need to attend a different date from my lane’s assigned date. Who should I contact? 

Please submit the alternative session request form on the Transitions site.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Rachel Rudeen, rude0105@umn.edu

Intersession

An integrated, longitudinal, on-campus required education activity focused on empowering students to transition successfully and resiliently into the role of physician. 

What if I have a conflict with Intersession Week?

If you believe you have a conflicting commitment that prohibits you from attending at least 50% of the required course sessions, you must submit a Petition for Alternate Arrangements. 

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Andrea Medina at inmd710x@umn.ed

Match Day

The culmination of the four years of medical school when students are matched with the residency program they will begin after graduation. 

When is Match Day?

Match Day is always on the third Friday of March.

Am I required to attend Match Day to find out my results? 

No, attending Match Day is optional, and all students who match will be emailed their results that day. 

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Rachel Rudeen (rude0105@umn.edu) for Match Day details. For questions related to the Match and residency application process, email Maija Braaten (mbraaten@umn.edu).

FoUrums

Each semester, the Office of Medical Education hosts four open forums for all students to hear from the medical school administration. These forums include: Welcome Back Forum (first week of classes), Wellbeing Forum, Deans Forum with Dr. Tolar, and an End of Semester Curriculum Feedback Forum

Do I need to RSVP for the forums?

Yes, lunch will be served at most forums so an accurate headcount is appreciated. An RSVP request will be sent via email prior to the forum. 

Are all classes invited to every forum? 

The Wellbeing and Deans Forums are open to any medical student, the Welcome Back and Curriculum Feedback Forums are specific to either the first or second year classes. 

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Rachel Rudeen, rude0105@umn.edu

Mistreatment and Harassment

The University of Minnesota and the Medical School recognize their obligation to their faculty, staff and the community to maintain the highest ethical standards. To facilitate this process the University has chosen Ethical Advocate to provide students with an anonymous way to report activities that may be violations of the University's policies or other laws, rules and regulations.

Reporting

Reporting an incident of mistreatment, harassment, or abuse of a medical student can be reported 24 hours, 7 days a week. 

How can I report an incident?

You can report online by using the EOAA Sexual Misconduct Reporting Form.  The form is an anonymous reporting service for the University of Minnesota (all campuses – TC, Duluth, Crookston, Morris, Rochester and other locations). Any University community member can submit a UReport if they suspect misconduct (students, faculty, staff, University, and non-University). You can find the link to report and other related information on the Equal Opportunity and Affimitive Action site

You can also file by calling or emailing the EOAA at 612-624-9547 or eoaa@umn.edu. If calling, you will get a live person that will ask you the questions. The questions the person will be asking are required from the online reporting system. Calls can be made 24/7.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Mary Tate, Director of Minority Affairs and Diversity, tatex001@umn.edu  (612) 625-1494
Michael Kim, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, mikekim@umn.edu  (612) 625-5180 
Robin Michaels, PhD, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, rmichael@d.umn.edu  (218) 726-8872

Related Policies

The medical school follows all University policies related to mistreatment and harassmsnet, including racial/ethnic harrassmentsexual harassment, and sexual assult.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Mary Tate, Director of Minority Affairs and Diversity, tatex001@umn.edu  (612) 625-1494
Michael Kim, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, mikekim@umn.edu  (612) 625-5180 
Robin Michaels, PhD, Associate Dean for Student Affairs, rmichael@d.umn.edu  (218) 726-8872

Learner Development

The Office of Learner Development (OLD) provides a range of service and resource options to support student & trainee performance and well-being. It is the offices goal to assist students in identifying ways of adapting learning approaches to meet the unique challenges of medical education, and in developing skills for lifelong learning, success and satisfaction in medicine.

Clinical Coaching

Students in their clinical years (years 3 and 4) have the opportunity to work with a Clinical Coach. Students who fail their Step 2CS, score low on their CCA (Clinical Competency Assessment), or are rated below average in clinical skills during rotations are referred to the Clinical Coach who reviews areas of concern and works with the student to enrich the deficient skills.

How do I get connected with the Director of Clinical Coaching?

Reach out to your Academic Advisor. They can refer you to the Director of Clinical Coaching and make that connection so you can set up an appointment. You may also receive an email invitation to meet. 

What does Clinical Coaching look like?

It depends on every student’s individual needs; the Director of Clinical Coaching meets with students to determine what areas they can improve upon, then a plan is created with follow-up.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Addy Irvine, Academic Advisor, abrickwe@umn.edu

Student Opportunities

Learning and discovery does not only happen in the classroom. From research, conferences, to fellowships and beyond, the medical school is always learning about new opportunities available to students to gain valuable experience outside the classroom and the medical school. 

Extra-curricular Opportunities

Learning and discovery does not only happen in the classroom. From research, conferences, student groups to fellowships and beyond, the medical school is always learning about new opportunities available to students to gain valuable experience outside the classroom and the medical school. You can find more information on extra-curricular opportunities here. Students can also get involved in shapping the medical both for today and the future by participating in student government, volunteering to participate on various committees, or providing feedback

How do current students find research opportunities to participate in?

Students have a wide range of opportunities to gain hands-on research experience, and contribute to medical advancements that create a healthier future for everyone. Students can do research for credit, for pay (such as through grant stipends), or as a volunteer. The med school has some annual research opportunities for students to apply to along with clinical electives in research. We also host a research database that local research preceptors and labs can post opportunities for students to join or lead. Our school is also lucky to have a wide range of specialty departments and centers that students can reach out to directly for opportunities.

How can students get involved in helping to shape the medical school?

The medical school is shaped by and for its students. There are various ways in which students can get involved. A few of the major ways are by participating in student council and government, by volunteering to join a governing committee,  or by getting involved in a student organization such as WellbeingCPAP, or a student interest group. An easy and vaulable way for all students to get involved in helping shape and improve the school and their experience is to offer feedback. Students can also get involved outside the school and participate in opportunites and help shape medical education nation wide through the Association of American Medical Colleges

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Scott Davenport, Director, Student Affairs, daven016@umn.edu, 612-624-8601

Student Travel Reimbursement

The school offers a limited amount of funds to support travel by medical students to national and regional medical organization meetings (no international travel can be funded). See the student funding page for more information

How can I apply for travel funds?

Requests for funding may be submitted throughout the academic year. In order to ensure the fairest distribution of resources, a student may receive funding only once per fiscal year (July 1 - June 30). Applications must be approved before the travel, and funding occurs in the form of a reimbursement after travel and submission of receipts for the student’s approved travel budget. Maximum funding will be $825.00 per student; the amount awarded may be decreased if more than one student attends the same meeting.

What are the criteria for receiving funding?

All requests must be submitted PRIOR to the travel taking place. Criteria for consideration of student requests:

  1. Students must be in good academic standing and not yet graduated from the Medical School at the time of the actual travel
  2. To receive funding, students must fall into one of the following categories;
    1. be presenting at the conference they wish to attend (oral or poster presentation of original research)
    2. be attending the conference as a panelist or a national organizational officer
    3. be receiving an award at the conference
  3. Impact: How will your trip benefit other students?

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Office of Student Affairs, medstuaf@umn.edu

Awards & Recognition

The University of Minnesota Medical School honors outstanding performance of its students through two national societies, and awards through the University Foundation. Learn more about each here.

What is AOA and how are students elected into it?

Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) is the National Honor Medical Society. The chapter at the University of Minnesota elects members from the Junior and Senior classes each year. The number of students elected to AOA is up to one sixth of the graduating class. Selection is made from those students in the top quartile of the class in academic standing; one-third  are elected in the junior year and the remainder in the senior year. The criteria used to elect students into the Society include accumulated points from year 1 and 2 courses, grades in required rotations, Step 1 score, and an essay. For more information visit the local chapter website and the National AOA website.

What is the Gold Humanism Honor Society and how are students elected into it?

The Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) honors senior medical students who "demonstrate excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service." Students are admitted into GHHS based on responses to a peer nomination survey toward the end of their third year of medical school. For more information, visit the U of MN Gold Humanism Honor Society website and the national site of The Arnold P. Gold Foundation.

Need more information? Reach out to:

Scott Davenport, Director, Student Affairs, daven016@umn.edy, 612-624-8601

Student Government and Committees

Students have various opportunities to help in advancing the interests and well-being of the Medical School and its students. From participating in student government, joining a committee, becoming a representative for national organizations, to participating in meetings and being involved in staff and faculty hiring processes, every student has the opportunity to help drive the future of the school and medical education.

Who makes up the Student Council? What student government positions are there?

Student Council is comprised entirely of students with guidance from Associate and Assistant Deans with the Medical School. The Council is made up of an Executive Committee and General Body. The Executive Committee consists of a President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary. The General Body consists of individual class Presidents, Class Representatives, and student representatives of various Medical School committees and councils, and various other officers.

What Medical School committees can I be a part of while in school?

All Committees and Councils within the medical school have student representatives. Beyond these Medical School committee opportunities, there are various national, University, and Academic Health Center committees students can participate as representatives on. Various Medical School Committees include: Educational Council, Clinical Education Committee, Peer Review Committee, Admissions Committee, Orientation Committee, Student Scholastic Standing Committee, Student Consultative Committee, Student Technology Resource Committee, Election Steering Committee, Scientific Foundations Committee, and the Committee on Assessment.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Student Council, medstuco@umn.edu

Student Professionalism

Medical students in lecture, small group, an administrator's office, clinic or the hospital, whether patients are in the room or not, are professionals and are required to act as such.

Student Professionalism Codes

Medical Students are expected to adhere to three codes of professionalism: Standards of Behaviour, Intellectual Responsibility, and the Compact for Teaching and Learning. Each of these spells out the general principles of professionalism that all students are entrusted to maintain and self enforce. All members of the University of Minnesota Medical School (faculty, staff and students) are responsible for upholding the ethic, honor and professionalism codes.

What is the procedure should a student violate any of the code and demonstrate unprofessional behaviour?

The Medical School maintains a strict policy on the reporting and handling violations of ethics/honor and professionalism codes by medical students. If a student, faculty or staff observes a violation by a medical student of the Medical Student Professionalism Code or the Statement of Intellectual Responsibility their first action should be to contact the chair of the medical student Peer Review Committee (PRC) or the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs would then advise and refer the accuser to the PRC). Once notified, the PRC contacts the accuser, solicits response from the accused, and recommends actions [PRC Procedural Guidelines] that may include:

  • Unsubstantiated accusation, no referral
  • Refer to Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
  • Refer to Committee on Student Scholastic Standing (COSSS)

You can find a complete outline of the process here.

Need More Information? Reach out to:

Michael Kim, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, mikekim@umn.edu